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It's Time to Stop Talking About Generations

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  The discovery that you can make money marketing merchandise to teen-agers dates from the early nineteen-forties, which is also when the term “youth culture” first appeared in print.  There was a reason that those things happened when they did: high school. Back in 1910, most young people worked; only fourteen per cent of fourteen- to seventeen-year-olds were still in school. In 1940, though, that proportion was seventy-three per cent. A social space had opened up between dependency and adulthood, and a new demographic was born: “youth.” The rate of high-school attendance kept growing. By 1955, eighty-four per cent of high-school-age Americans were in school. (The figure for Western Europe was sixteen per cent.) Then, between 1956 and 1969, college enrollment in the United States more than doubled, and “youth” grew from a four-year demographic to an eight-year one. By 1969, it made sense that everyone was talking about the styles and values and tastes of young people: almost half the

How to Maximize the Later Chapters of Your Life

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  NEW YORK, Aug 18 (Reuters) - Think for a moment about all the stereotypes of older workers. Michael Clinton has a suggestion for you: Blow those stereotypes up. The former president and publishing director of Hearst Magazines is finished with outdated conceptions that might have applied back in the 1950s, but have nothing to do with current realities in which we are living longer and healthier lives. That is why he penned the new book “Roar: Into the Second Half of Your Life (Before It’s Too Late).” Clinton talked with Reuters about making life's second half as fruitful, or more so, than the first. To keep reading this article, click here.

Let's Go Living in the Past - 1971

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History 50 years ago The Pentagon Papers  shocked America and they still matter The 26th Amendment gives 18-year-olds the right to vote Lifestyle, Culture and Sports Ali-Frazier was much more than just a heavyweight fight The year that gave us Starbucks, Disney World, and NASDAQ  Films  'The Omega Man'   depicts the last man on earth 50 years later, 'Klute' still has much to say about sex 'The Andromeda Strain' sounded a viral alert  'A Clockwork Orange' still disturbing 'Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory'  satisfies your sweet tooth 'The Devils' - The Best Horror Movie of 1971? TV Sonny and Cher take their shtick to TV Books 50 years of Hunter Thompson's ' Fear and Loathing' Music Remembering when the Fillmore West closed 50 years ago David Bowie's 1971 performance at the Friar's Club

All Things Must Pass - A List of Stars Lost in 1971

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Whenever a famous star dies, it’s not only their family and friends who grieve for them—their fans are devastated as well, even if they never met or saw their icon in person.  Why, exactly, are we so affected by celebrity deaths? Celebrities, such as actors, athletes, and musicians, can leave a lasting mark on people, explains psychotherapist Tom Kersting. We don’t personally know these celebrities, but there’s no doubt that their work can leave a positive imprint on our minds and memories.  If you’re one of the many fans struggling to come to terms with this week’s sad news, or you have found it difficult to cope with one of the recent celebrity deaths, Kersting has some tips.  First, try to focus on the positives that the celebrity brought to your life. “As a long-time Grateful Dead fan I remember how I felt when Jerry Garcia died,” he says. “Although I was sad about his passing, I smiled at the same time because his music created countless positive experiences for me with friends th

The New Film 'The Many Saints of Newark' Shows The Roots of 'The Sopranos"

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The reviews may be mixed, but David Chase's movie The Many Saints of Newark, which depicts the 1967 beginnings of many of the characters who will play a major crime family role in Chase's classic HBO series The Sopranos , which many believe is the best TV series ever aired, but articles on the new film have flooded the internet. Here is a sample of some of them: The 10 episodes of The Sopranos you should watch before you see the new prequel film Who's Who in The Many Saints of Newark Why is every young person in American watching The Sopranos  What really did happen to Tony in that least fade-to-black scene in The Sopranos The Sopranos Insider's guide to The Many Saints of Newark Every Sopranos character who returned in The Many Saints of Newark' Where are the cast members of The Sopranos today?

How 1971's 'Diet for a Small Planet' Helped Spark Our Ongoing Food Revolution

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  A thin, dog-eared paperback graced our kitchen’s bookshelf from the time I was just about old enough to see above the counter. To my child’s eyes, its title, “Diet for a Small Planet,” seemed welcoming: I was a small person, so what could be bad about a small planet? Indeed, author Frances Moore LappĂ© is the first to say that her book, and the 50 years of work focused on the intersection of food and democracy that has followed, is about hope. “I’m not an optimist — I’m a possible-ist,” she says. “Everything is possible, we just have to make it happen.” To keep reading this article, click here

Tech Billionaires Seek Key to Immortality - Will It Benefit All or Just the Few Uber-Rich?

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  All things must die, according to the poet Alfred Lord Tennyson, but that could be about to change. A growing number of tech billionaires have decided they want to use their enormous wealth to try to help humans “cheat death.” Amazon ’s Jeff Bezos,  Alphabet ’s Larry Page,  Oracle ’s Larry Ellison and Palantir’s Peter Thiel are just a few of the super-rich who have taken a keen interest in the fast-emerging field of longevity, according to interviews, books and media reports. While breakthroughs are far from guaranteed, they hope that various medicines, therapies and other life science technologies will enable humans to live well beyond 100 years old and possibly to 200, 300, or even longer. But are their efforts going to benefit humanity as a whole or just an elite few? It’s a tricky question that divides opinion. To keep reading this article, click here.